As country after country reels from revelations about the systemic sexual abuse of children in the Catholic Church, three of Australia’s pre‑eminent voices discuss the crimes and causes of this institutional dysfunction. Tom Keneally (Crimes of the Father), James M. Miller (The Priests) and Louise Milligan (Cardinal) join David Marr (Quarterly Essay: The Prince) for a powerful conversation about sexual abuse, conscience and celibacy in the Catholic Church.

David Marr (Australian)

David Marr

David Marr is a journalist and broadcaster who now writes for Guardian Australia. He’s published a couple of biographies and a number of books about politics, censorship and immigration. Over the last 10 years he has written a number of Quarterly Essays. His latest is The White Queen: One Nation and the Politics of Race. He previously presented Media Watch and appears regularly on Insiders and The Drum. His most recent book is My Country, an anthology of essays.

Tom Keneally (Australian)

Tom Keneally

Tom Keneally won The Booker Prize in 1982 with Schindler's Ark, later made into the Steven Spielberg Academy Award-winning film Schindler's List. His non-fiction includes the memoir Searching for Schindler and Three Famines, an LA Times Book of the Year; and the histories The Commonwealth of Thieves, The Great Shame and American Scoundrel. His fiction includes Shame and the Captives, The Daughters of Mars, The Widow and Her Hero (shortlisted for the Prime Minister's Literary Award), An Angel in Australia and Bettany's Book. His novels The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith, Gossip from the Forest, and Confederates were all shortlisted for the Booker Prize, while Bring Larks and Heroes and Three Cheers for the Paraclete won the Miles Franklin Award. The People's Train was longlisted for the Miles Franklin Award and shortlisted for the Commonwealth Writers Prize, South East Asia division. His latest novel is The Dickens Boy.