The scientific method is designed to be objective. So what happens when you take science personally? Ashley Hay talks to author James Bradley (The Silent Invasion), neurosurgeon Henry Marsh (Do No Harm), author Bianca Nogrady (The End: The Human Experience of Death) and The Guardian Australia environment reporter Michael Slezak. They discuss how journalists can report dispassionately on the disturbing effects of climate change, how surgeons bear the burden of human error and how novelists can translate science for wider audiences. 

James Bradley (Australian)

James Bradley

James Bradley is a writer and critic. His books include the novels Wrack, The Deep Field, The Resurrectionist and Clade; a book of poetry, Paper Nautilus; and the anthology, The Penguin Book of the Ocean. In 2012, he won the Pascall Prize for Australia’s Critic of the Year. His most recent novel is Ghost Species.

Ashley Hay (Australian)

Ashley Hay

Ashley Hay is a novelist and essayist whose awards include the Foundation of Australian Literary Studies’ Colin Roderick Award, the NSW Premier’s Literary Awards Peoples’ Choice, and the Bragg/UNSW Press Prize for Science Writing. Her writing has been shortlisted for awards including the Commonwealth Writers' Prize and Queensland Literary Awards, and longlisted for prizes including the International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award and the Miles Franklin. Her novels include The Body in the Clouds and A Hundred Small Lessons. She is the editor of Griffith Review.