The Indigenous peoples of Australia had many methods of managing the harsh climate. In his novel Dark Emu, Bruce Pascoe explores pre-colonial agricultural practices with new insight. Climate Scientist Tim Flannery joins Bruce to discuss early forms of land management as described in the records and diaries of Colonial explorers. They will also consider what we can learn from these practices today.

Related links: Science, History, Ancient Australia, Geography, Agriculture

Supported by NSW Education Standards Authority.

Bruce Pascoe (Australian)

Bruce Pascoe

Bruce Pascoe is an award-winning writer and a Yuin, Bunurong and Tasmanian man. He is a Board member of First Languages Australia and Professor of Indigenous Knowledge at the University of Technology Sydney. In 2018, he was named Dreamtime Person of the Year for his contribution to Indigenous culture. Salt is a collection of his best and most celebrated stories and essays, which traverses his long career and explores his enduring fascination with Australia’s landscape, culture and history.

Tim Flannery (Australian)

Tim Flannery

Tim Flannery is the 2007 Australian of the Year. He is Chief Councillor of the Australian Climate Council, Australia's largest and most successful crowdfunded organisation, which he founded in 2013. He is currently Distinguished Visiting Fellow in Climate Change at the Australian Museum, Sydney. Tim has taught at Harvard University and has advised governments both in Australia and Canada. In 2007, he established and co-chaired the Copenhagen Climate Council, and in 2011 was appointed Australia's first Climate Commissioner. He serves on the Board of the Prince Albert II Foundation, and has been a board member of WWF International and the Australian Wildlife Conservancy and an advisor to the National Geographic Society. He has published more than 140 peer-reviewed scientific papers and has named 25 living and 50 fossil mammal species, many from Papua New Guinea. His 32 books include The Future Eaters and The Weather Makers, which has been translated into more than 20 languages. He has made numerous documentaries and regularly writes for The New York Review of Books.